Tuesday, February 27, 2007

She denied everything

Hey i had a lovely Bday, all the attention, Thanks for your lovely messages, for the good friends and the bad ones, God Bless ya'll.

Anyway i was having a conversation with my mum about my childhood.

I reminded her of the way she caned me way back then and specifically pointed that in Standard 3 she did that everyday.

She retorted that i was a "muremi" meaning naughty/doesn't listen/ ok what do you say in English?

Then, she thought about it and she declared that

" I have never beaten you at all"

Every kid who lived when i was a kid doesn't need a father to collaborate my story.

6 p.m in the hood was beat naughty kid time, all kids used to cry at the same time.

So does your mum deny ever correcting you?

26 comments:

  1. I have never talked to my mum about chapaing me, coz all she ever did was pinch us - and we truly deserved a pinching then. the one person i would like to confront is my dad. That man???? I have every reason to believe he beat us coz he had no drum. There was nothing right you could do in his eyes. That was then. Will I ever confront him? I don't know :-(

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  2. I remember those times! sometimes I look @ her n wonder was it really necessary??
    But I guess so!

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  3. @ chatterly:
    lol @ "he beat us coz he had no drum.."

    shiro:
    my mum used to ENJOY chapaing us. Sometimes she would chapa all of us for the mistakes of one person...she once chapad me infront of my classmates, when i was in class two and then declared "eterera ukinye mucii" [wait till u get home]... as if she hadn't humuliated me enuff ...

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  4. Am those mami kids have not been chapwad by mum or dad but the elders woi kifo. Sikio and mashafu pulling Woi why did you ask her? She can never say yes. My mum is one woman who knows to answer those questions will tell you what she told my bros.

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  5. though my mom didn't beat me much, she's never touched my younger bro or sis. i always tell them they're so unfortunate not to experience two things; being chapwad and being sent to the kiosk or kwa fulani.

    a belated happy birthday...

    lol @ chatterly

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  7. Haha!! Great post!

    I asked my mum the very same question the other day after observing my little niece get away with pretty much everything short of murder and the entire time all mum was doing was watching on with love in her eyes nikama my ka niece’s tears can cure cancer. So I asked her why I was disconnected *read beaten* on pretty much a daily basis when I was a young un’ and unsurprisingly at this point amnesia checked in. Strangely I wouldn’t change this aspect of growing up for the world. Yes S&M ni mimi I know lol.

    For the Kikuyus I am sure that when you were growing up that at least once you ingiad the digs after a long day of playing and shukaing grass to be told ‘ni nda kugeithia’. Ngutness.

    Hope you are well Shi.

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  8. That's parents for you! In their eyes they gave you a charmed childhood.

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  9. Mum was a terror. First you'd be sent to fetch your own chapaing stick (thinking we were clever we would unleash ati a single stick from a kifagio). So the pano would be doubled for that atrocity. Second, anything was a weapon - her old belt being my worst enemy. Third, she would enter a room and hit anyone with anything in sight. You serve your sentence before the hearing.

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  10. LOL.
    Hey mami.
    Riiri,glad to hear your bday rocked asses.
    LOOOL eti all kiddos used to cry at the same time..like a choir in syncrony, there is the alto, the tenor, the sop....tihiii, mwehehhe, halafu if you are beaten too long, you become a solo. Aiii, I can hear a village going down like that!!

    Me? my mum....tehe, she actually reminds me of it, like "remember when you tried to show me who is boss and I creamed your ass to kingdom come?" Ok, not in those words, but she always laces it with virtue like, 'remember when you refused to do your homweork and I beat you kidogo thats why you WERE so clever'. Yaani, aiii.
    Sheesh!!!

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  11. @Chatterly LMAO

    @Shiro niaje sweetie.
    Wah! i dont think any1 hs been chapwad like me. Being first born is hell. My siblings loose a bk...kiboko. I drop my position lk no. 6 to no.7...kiboko...
    I chapa my bro or sis...kiboko.
    Smetymes i'd volunteerly surrender myself b4 am called coz it ws obvious nitacharazwa...with a mwiko..lol

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  12. didn't get beaten too much, but the pinches a guy my guy you guy!!!! When you start crying and you know you've done something and you're crying just to get off easy...hear the words "let me give you something to cry about" and know your plan didn't quite work and you are in for it.

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  13. Happy Belated Birthday!

    Mothers have strange memories; they forget certain incidents that were such a big deal to you as a kid. Mine does that.

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  14. My beatings were not very much from my mathe...but cucu(GrandMas)...Now this ma(m)bo...He! Si now you can gess the gicagi is in me like a nonsesical choir tune...Waah mi na dada iliwanga rope>>Múkanda!! My how we'd do a perfect duet...na mbuyu anaangalia tu...shame..."Mutikaingere nyumba mutagutheka!!"||Don't come in if you're not laughing...she was sick I tell you...Ok. I withdraw the last one but hidings...nimeonja!!
    Lol! @ choir!!

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  15. LOL at d-shy's nindakugeithia, heard that phrase one too many times, km and bantutu eish
    It didn't help that my ma was a teacher in my school so a beating at school and one at home. Man, did i get beat esp being that i was the hood tomboy, the dirt, torn clothed out playing late to fights with the boys LOL. She admits and justifies that its the reason am the woman that iam LOl.

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  16. Being first born meant that I faced all the beatings, but the time the 3rd born came along there was no beating allowed even caning in school was baned. I was so jealous. We all turned out okay with beating or bila so I guess it doesn't make a difference either way.

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  17. Happy belated birthday! And on being corrected, I wouldn't for the love of me, bring that up with my mom! Probably because I was always a wayward child....

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  18. Once again I am in the minority. Our parents never beat us and I have never known why, but I am glad they didn't.

    Glad you ahd a great b'day!!!

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  19. I remember one time my mum tied me and my sis on a pole and started beating us outside the house.

    Ngai fafa, the woman used her nails to pinch my thighs, slippers to whip my butt, No wonder.

    i can make good Oprah Winfrey guest.

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  20. Now where do i begin...every day...not really but it did look like every day...ball through french window..now how was i to know my ndole would go that far...bike, gate, head on, do the math..are you ok...twaff twaff...hehehe...now if you ask you receive blank stares...missing coins from dads mots..man!...wacha tu...kids wa siku hizo sio adventurers...mkanda ya mbuyu...if matters are handed to him...pure leather belt.....and he still has it upto now...seven kids later! mathe...pinch..smack with some original bata slippers that were tougher than akalas...i swear...see how well i turned out...tihiiii

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  21. My mom neither confirms nor denies having beaten us. She just smiles whenever we make any reference to it.

    Lakini we were all beaten me getting the worst bit of it as she had no previous experience in the subject.

    Daddy only beat the extreme cases, I was not one of them.
    Any time was beating time there was even a special cane kept in their room for that no mikandas and slippers.

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  22. good one.People say that osama is dangerous.that means they have never met my mom.My mom wud chapa us so much mpaka we wondered if she was actuallt our mom or the evil step mom.She sends you for something & u take long she wud ask,"unataka nikuje"?& that wud mean kichapo.There are times she wud beat u u go jificha under the bed but she wud still come after u.Nowdays we ask her & all she does is smile & say,"singewachapa hivyo mgekuwa wapi saa hii"?i guess she is right but still,i look at our last born & wonder coz the onlt time my mom chapad him,he ran away from home & became a chokora for one noght & mom swore no one was ever going to touch her son again.Sisi tungekuwa hivyo tungekuwa tumekuwa street kids kitambo sana.Thanks for letting me know we were not the only ones who were chapwad.Guess i shud start a blog where we can compare & see if all our moms went to the same parenting school bak in the days

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  23. Madam
    Kudos on the post. It was funny, but the comments are even funnier.

    Us guys were almost best friends with the word "Níndakúgeithia." Yaani, mpaka we learnt how to tell each other the same.

    But I remember one instance when my bro and couzo were caught scaling the gate to our house. Wooi! Si waliona war?
    First, they were beaten ... and then the rest of the conversation went something like ...

    "Now bring those hands which were holding the gate" (pinch)
    "And the eyes which were looking at the places to step on" (pinch)
    "And the mouths which were discussing why you should climb" ...

    Poor soodwens. Waliona cha mtema kuni, I tell you.

    @ Ichiena
    Sounds like our mums were cut off the same cloth.

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  24. absolutely good post!
    sounds like i am in good company! my mother was just in a class of her own. i remember on particular one...she fixed me and and my kid bro so much, we nose bled and just as we were preparing to nurse our wounds some vistors arrived. she had the cheek to cal us aside and tel us to be entertaining to the guest or else...!

    about 18 years down the line, we asked her to apologize for this one particular incidence and she did!...i guess she is now ok that we turned out exactly the way she wanted!
    but i still find myself wondering whether it was that necesary.

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  25. This was an extremely hilarious post. i surely remember níndakúgeithia. Man I haven't laughed this hard in a while and reading the stories brought lots of memories of being 'fixed'.

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  26. You guys...ask me what is to be beaten like sawasawa. Once my mum was in her bad mood and she really gave me a good beating with a mukanda(rope) (for Kuni). So i told here, that i am gonna nyonga myself if she hits me again. Haiya....that was the wrong keyword. The beating got better! and at last she game me the mukanda (rope) !go nyonga yourself!!. Then i was like dude, how do i do this. Wish google was there by then for i would have done a search on how to nyonya my neck.Love you mom!

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